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24 May 2003, Montreal, Canada

This was my first visit to Canada and thus to Montreal. There were photobooths all over the city at train stations, shopping centres and  tourist spots. Yay Montreal!!

This strip of photos comes from my series Photobooth 46 Year Project. The complete set of posts to date, can be seen in reverse order at the link Photobooth 45 Year Project (Archive) under the Categories heading in the side bar, on the right of this post.

Many of the photos in this long series are unremarkable. They make up a photographic album of my adult life, which gives me a lot of pleasure as I add each new photo to the collection. I also love the memories they bring back, when I write about them for this blog.

For those of you who are new subscribers or visitors to this blog, UK artist Dick Jewell made a video using photos from this project in 2012. It can be seen on Vimeo here.

 

I am very grateful to Peter from Documenting the Obvious photography blog, who let me know last week that an interview I did with Lomography Magazine had been published. I had been checking their site on and off, hoping to find it but without success.

It is the second time I’ve been mentioned on Lomography.com but the first time I’ve been formally interviewed.

The link is here if you’d like to have a read. This is the previous mention. Thank you to Ciel Hernandez, one of the copywriting editors of Lomography Magazine, for contacting me. I was very pleased to be asked.

22 May 2003, Leicester Station, Leicester, UK

This was taken on my way to London to stay the night with my cousin Xie. I flew to Canada the following day.

This strip of photos comes from my series Photobooth 46 Year Project. The complete set of posts to date, can be seen in reverse order at the link Photobooth 45 Year Project (Archive) under the Categories heading in the side bar, on the right of this post.

For those of you who are new subscribers or visitors to this blog, UK artist Dick Jewell made a video using photos from this project in 2012. It can be seen on Vimeo here.

 

7 May 2003, Dublin, Ireland

When I lived in Leicestershire I was able to frequently visit my sister and her family in Dublin. Here I am with my nephew and godson Cal, and his baby sister Penny. I imagine this was taken somewhere near Tallaght where they live.

This strip of photos comes from my series Photobooth 46 Year Project. The complete set of posts to date, can be seen in reverse order at the link Photobooth 45 Year Project (Archive) under the Categories heading in the side bar, on the right of this post.

Many of the photos in this long series are unremarkable. They make up a photographic album of my adult life, which gives me a lot of pleasure as I add each new photo to the collection. I also love the memories they bring back, when I write about them for this blog.

For those of you who are new subscribers or visitors to this blog, UK artist Dick Jewell made a video using photos from this project in 2012. It can be seen on Vimeo here.

 

I think I might have gone a bit over the top, (some might say a bit mad), when making my Easter bunny mask and eyebrows. Stangely, even though the eyebrows are made with the same colour pink paper as the cheeks, (see below), they do not register the same way in the photo. Even after all these years, I am still struggling with working out the best colours and tones to wear to get the best results in black and white booths. A bright orange dress I was wearing the other day, read as black in the photos. That was a total surprise to me. I guess that means Orange really Is The New Black.

The photobooth where I took these strips, is in a suburb of Melbourne that is close to the hospital where my cardiologist has her consultancy. Though going to endless specialist appointments is tedious in many ways, if I can squeeze in a trip to an old fashioned booth at the same time, I am happier.

I hope you got a laugh from my photos. I sure did! Happy Easter to you all.

What’s Up Doc?

I have written about Marco Ferrari and his photobooth art before. He is a passionate lover of this special genre of photography and I am a passionate lover of his work.

Marco uses his booth photos to create beautiful fine art prints. I am the proud owner of two examples. He doesn’t have his own booth in London, where he currently lives, so makes his art using public machines, some of which he maintains. When using booths he services, he can control exposure but, unlike other booth artists, he doesn’t control the timing of the photos. This not only leads to beautiful, spontaneous images but is a testament to his creativity and skill.

For him the booth is a safe environment for the subjects he wishes to photograph. Most of the people he works with are not used to posing for a photographer, so the closed, private environment of the booth allows the sitter to relax. This contributes to their ability to freely express themselves in the way they pose. Marco has an idea of what he wishes to achieve in a photo session, so directs the sitter from outside. When the photos are finished he shows them to the subject and suggests ways they could change or improve what they have done.

“I try not to direct too much because I don’t want the same photos from everyone. I try to capture their unique personality.”

I was very touched and excited when this original strip of photos arrived in the post as a gift from Marco. These are from one of the booths he maintains, so he was able to achieve the sepia tones by adjusting the developing chemicals. I love the poses he has chosen but I am especially enamoured with his wonderful, curly moustache.

If you have not already seen it, please read this post and check the links to Marco’s work.

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